I came across a scrap of paper today at work, on which I had scrawled several ideas for essays/blogs about brain surgery. 

  • musical intelligence — I have tackled this one
  • the whomping stick (about my cane) — ditto
  • “throwing up” on people (telling them about my surgery)
  • PT and OT
  • epilepsy vs. alcoholism

That last one I’ve never addressed in any form on this site.  I’ve tried to explain it to people, but without much success.  Here’s the idea: in alcoholism, a person will forever remain an alcoholic, even after years of sobriety.  Once an alcoholic, always an alcoholic, because he could go back so easily, slip up so easily, and send himself back down into addiction.

As for epilepsy, I recall Dr. Zager or Dr. Hart saying (I remember it so well, I can’t recall which doctor actually said it) that once the brain has learned to seize, there is always a risk that it will seize again.  The more time the passes seizure-free, the lower the risk of another seizure, the longer one is likely to stay seizure-free, but there remains a chance, a possibility of relapse into a seizure.

So here’s the connection: once the brain has learned that specific “behavior” — be it addiction to alcohol, or seizures — there is always a change it may relapse, especially if one does not avoid triggers, like alcohol, sleep deprivation, caffeine, and dehydration — for epilepsy, or well, alcohol, in the case of alcoholism.

And my question has been, if I had epilepsy once (or for 8 years), will I have epilepsy for the rest of my life?  Does my insurance company think so?  Do I?  Do my doctors?  Am I “cured” of the underlying physiology of the AVM — all indications say yes — yet do I still carry the label of epilepsy?  In the age of people- first language, I can certainly escape the designation of “epileptic”, but can I so easily leave behind the diagnosis, the condition, the lingering possibility of a seizure, and epilepsy itself?

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